Processing Yam or Ubi


Ubi powder. Wash a kilogram of matured and unblemished ubi (preferably the purple variety), and cook unpeeled in 960 cc of water for 30 minutes. Cool before peeling, then grate with an ordinary kitchen grater. Dry for four hours in an oven with a temperature of 40o to 50oC. Pulverize the dried yam in a corn mill grinder and sift through a 70-mesh sieve. Pack and seal the powder in sterile glass jars, then store at the room temperature.

Yam flour. Wash the tubers thoroughly in running water. Cut into slices 2 inches (5 cm) thick, and cook for 20 to 25 minutes or until soft. Peel and mash into pulp, then spread out thinly, about .75 inches (2 cm) thick. Dry for 6 to 8 hours at a temperature of 122o to 158oF (50o to 70oC) until the pulp is only about 10 per cent moist. Ground the dried product finely and sift before packing in polyethene sacks.

Yam chips. This is a relatively new way of processing yam similar to banana chips. Slice the yam thinly and deep dry in fat. Then, allow to cool before packing in bags.

Harvested ubi tubers may be sold yam processors, or made into processed goods for various recipes.

Mashed ubi. Mashed ubi is used in making ubi tarts, ubi fillings, pastillas,yemas, ubi flan, and other delicacies.

For marketable mashed ubi, select good quality tubers. Wash them to remove adhering dirt and divide into half kilo sections. Cook by steaming or boiling for 30 to 45 minutes. Afterwards, peel before shredding or mashing.

Place the processed ubi in a plastic bag, leaving just enough space to seal the bag. store the packed mashed ubi in a freezer for not longer than 6 to 8 months.

Powdered ubi. Wash, cut and boil the yam tubers as making mashed ubi. Peel and slice into thin chips. dry under the sun or with dryer until hard and brittle. Grind chips and sift to fine flour. Repeat grinding and sifting until all the powder is similar to flour in texture.

Place the powdered ubi in plastic bags, and seal completely. Store in a cool dry room.


Source: DOST, photo courtesy of www.marketmanila.com, www.hormel.com, and www.tribo.org.

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